Read This to Understand Windows 10 Update Names and Numbers

Windows 10 has lots of overlapping version names and numbers. For example, the October 2020 Update is also referred to as 20H2, version 2009, and build 19042. It often seems like different teams at Microsoft are speaking different languages. Here is the way to decode Microsoft’s jargon.

The Development Codename (“20H2”)
Every Windows 10 Update begins with a growth codename.

It was named”20H2″ because it was planned for release in the second half of 2020. Simple!

In theory, these evolution codenames are only that: For the Windows development process and Windows Insiders. In practice, Microsoft has a great deal of documentation that utilizes them, referring to”20H2″ and”20H1.” These modern development codenames are easy to comprehend, and it is clear that a good deal of Microsoft employees prefer them.

These development codenames seem to be replacing the model numbers in Windows 10’s interface. If you go to Settings > System > Around, you’ll see the development codename introduced as the”version” below Windows Specifications.

Here’s a list of Windows 10’s development codenames for updates, so from most recent to oldest:

Windows 10 receives two of those updates a year. In 2019, it is possible to view that Microsoft shifted to a simple naming system denoting the entire year and a half the year the upgrade was released in.

Prior to this, Microsoft termed these updates” Redstone,” after a sort of block in Minecraft, which Microsoft purchased. The Threshold was the original codename for Windows 10.

But normal people do not understand development codenames, right? To make matters”easier” for the masses, Microsoft created official names for each update, designed to make them pleasant and human-readable. When an upgrade is near release, it gets one of these names.

In the last few decades, these names are pretty self-explanatory. That’s the month and year the update was published.

These names generally appear in blog articles and slick marketing videos rather than at the Windows 10 operating system.

We call them”advertising names” because that is exactly what they clearly originally were. After an uninspired first update title (the”November Update”), the marketing team kicked into action. A year after release, Windows obtained the”Anniversary Update”–a very good title, really.

Things then started to be confusing, with Windows 10 receiving a”Creators Update” full of splashy attributes like Paint 3D and Windows Mixed Reality. This was followed by the”Fall Creators Update” for some reason.

The Fall Creators Update was clearly the low-water mark for Windows marketing names, and Microsoft stopped trying to create flashy titles after that.

Even with Microsoft presenting names such as”October 2020 Update” because the official ones, lots of Microsoft documents use terms such as”20H2″ or”variant 2009″ instead.

Even Windows 10 itself does not use this title –perhaps because it is created by the engineers and not the advertising division. As we mentioned above, the Settings > System > About window uses the word”20H2″ and does not mention that the words”October 2020 Update” at all in seemingly silent protest against those titles.

Windows 10 has version numbers which are different from the development codename! It is true.

The Windows 10 October 2020 Update is Windows 10 variant 2009. The first two digits represent the year and the last two digits represent the month. Thus, the number refers to… September 2020.

However, this really is the October 2020 Update, right? Microsoft is perplexing once more here, and the model number appears to refer to this month that the update was”finalized” (and possibly released to Insiders,) whereas the promotion title refers to this upgrade the month has been released.

Microsoft is getting away from such numbers, with growth names such as”20H2″ now revealed in the Settings > System > About screen and at the winter dialogue. (Press Windows+R, type” winver” and press Enter to launch it.) In older versions of Windows 10, these screens showed the version number instead.

While Microsoft is downplaying this amount, you may see it occasionally. As an example, Microsoft’s Windows 10 Update Assistant refers to the October 2020 Update as”variant 2009.”

A variety of Microsoft support files use version numbers such as”variant 2009,” too.

The OS Build Number (“Construct 19042”)
Windows 10 also includes an operating system (OS) construct amounts. During the Windows development process, every”construct” of all Windows 10 released to Windows Insiders has its own build number.

After much testing and bug-fixing, Microsoft settles on a final construct that will be the stable version of the upgrade. When the update is published, it still has this OS build number.

Technically, the complete telephone number is”10.0.19042,” to signify that it is a Windows 10 build. Only the last five digits alter.

Additionally, there are minor build numbers–the secure version of 20H2 is original “19042.572”, however, the”572″ number increases as Microsoft issues minor patches for the upgrade.

These figures tell us something intriguing: 20H2 appears like a minor upgrade to 20H1, and 19H2 appears like am

Windows 10 has lots of overlapping version names and numbers. For example, the October 2020 Update is also referred to as 20H2, version 2009, and build 19042. It often seems like different teams at Microsoft are speaking different languages. Here is the way to decode Microsoft’s jargon.

The Development Codename (“20H2”)
Every Windows 10 Update begins with a growth codename.

It was named”20H2″ because it was planned for release in the second half of 2020. Simple!

In theory, these evolution codenames are only that: For the Windows development process and Windows Insiders. In practice, Microsoft has a great deal of documentation that utilizes them, referring to”20H2″ and”20H1.” These modern development codenames are easy to comprehend, and it is clear that a good deal of Microsoft employees prefer them.

These development codenames seem to be replacing the model numbers in Windows 10’s interface. If you go to Settings > System > Around, you’ll see the development codename introduced as the”version” below Windows Specifications.

Here’s a list of Windows 10’s development codenames for updates, so from most recent to oldest:

Windows 10 receives two of those updates a year. In 2019, it is possible to view that Microsoft shifted to a simple naming system denoting the entire year and a half the year the upgrade was released in.

Prior to this, Microsoft termed these updates” Redstone,” after a sort of block in Minecraft, which Microsoft purchased. Threshold was the original codename for Windows 10.

But normal people do not understand development codenames, right? To make matters”easier” for the masses, Microsoft created official names for each update, designed to make them pleasant and human-readable. When an upgrade is near release, it gets one of these names.

In the last few decades, these names are pretty self-explanatory. That’s the month and year the update was published.

These names generally appear in blog articles and slick marketing videos rather than at the Windows 10 operating system.

We call them”advertising names” because that is exactly what they clearly originally were. After an uninspired first update title (the”November Update”), the marketing team kicked into action. A year after release, Windows obtained the”Anniversary Update”–a very good title, really.

Things then started to be confusing, with Windows 10 receiving a”Creators Update” full of splashy attributes like Paint 3D and Windows Mixed Reality. This was followed by the”Fall Creators Update” for some reason.

The Fall Creators Update was clearly the low-water mark for Windows marketing names, and Microsoft stopped trying to create flashy titles after that.

Even with Microsoft presenting names such as”October 2020 Update” because the official ones, lots of Microsoft documents use terms such as”20H2″ or”variant 2009″ instead.

Even Windows 10 itself does not use this title –perhaps because it is created by the engineers and not the advertising division. As we mentioned above, the Settings > System > About window uses the word”20H2″ and does not mention that the words”October 2020 Update” at all in seemingly silent protest against those titles.

Windows 10 has version numbers which are different from the development codename! It is true.

The Windows 10 October 2020 Update is Windows 10 variant 2009. The first two digits represent the year and the last two digits represent the month. Thus, the number refers to… September 2020.

However, this really is the October 2020 Update, right? Microsoft is perplexing once more here, and the model number appears to refer to this month that the update was”finalized” (and possibly released to Insiders,) whereas the promotion title refers to this upgrade the month has been released.

Microsoft is getting away from such numbers, with growth names such as”20H2″ now revealed in the Settings > System > About screen and at the winver dialogue. (Press Windows+R, type” winver” and press Enter to launch it.) In older versions of Windows 10, these screens showed the version number instead.

While Microsoft is downplaying this amount, you may see it occasionally. As an example, Microsoft’s Windows 10 Update Assistant refers to the October 2020 Update as”variant 2009.”

A variety of Microsoft support files use version numbers such as”variant 2009,” too.

The OS Build Number (“Construct 19042”)
Windows 10 also includes an operating system (OS) construct amounts. During the Windows development process, every”construct” of all Windows 10 released to Windows Insiders has its own build number.

After much testing and bug-fixing, Microsoft settles on a final construct that will be the stable version of the upgrade. When the update is published, it still has this OS build number.

Technically, the complete telephone number is”10.0.19042,” to signify that it is a Windows 10 build. Only the last five digits alter.

Additionally, there are minor build numbers–the secure version of 20H2 is original “19042.572”, however, the”572″ number increases as Microsoft issues minor patches for the upgrade.

These figures tell us something intriguing: 20H2 appears like a minor upgrade to 20H1, and 19H2 appears like a minor update to 19H1. That really is true–equally 20H2 and 19H2 were minor updates with few changes within the prior release.

The numbers in between are development versions of Windows 10 which are occasionally released in preview form into Windows Insiders. By way of instance, build 19023 was an early model of 20H1 released to Insiders during the development procedure. There was no build 19024 released publicly, but there was a construct 19025, suggesting that construct 19024 was a construct kept internal at Microsoft and never released.

Different Microsoft documents refer to Windows construct amounts. By way of instance, a document on a feature might say it was inserted in a specific build, so you may see precisely when it looked at the Windows development process. If you hunt for information about a specific build on Microsoft’s Windows Insider website, you can see what ultimate update version a construct correspond to–for instance, that construct 19023 document says it is an early build of 20H1.

So What Do You Do With All This Information?
At times, it feels like different teams at Microsoft are speaking different languages. 1 document talks about 20H2, yet other talks about variant 2009, a technical document refers to build 19042, and the advertising team speaks up the October 2020 Update. They’re all talking about precisely the same thing.

Now that you understand this, it’s easier to make sense of this jumble of variation numbers you see across Microsoft’s sites and within Windows 10 itself.

We advocate using Google or a different internet search engine for a translation tool. If you see a document talking about”variant 1903,” build 18363,” 19H2,” or the”Fall Creators Update” and you are not sure what it is referring to, do a web search for that term and you’ll come across the other titles corresponding to that upgrade.

Hopefully, Microsoft will simplify things further. The confusing year+month variant numbers which don’t really correspond to the month that the update has been published are being downplayed, which is a good beginning.

minor update to 19H1. That really is true–equally 20H2 and 19H2 were minor updates with few changes within the prior release.

The numbers in between are development versions of Windows 10 which are occasionally released in preview form into Windows Insiders. By way of instance, build 19023 was an early model of 20H1 released to Insiders during the development procedure. There was no build 19024 released publicly, but there was a construct 19025, suggesting that construct 19024 was a construct kept internal at Microsoft and never released.

Different Microsoft documents refer to Windows construct amounts. By way of instance, a document on a feature might say it was inserted in a specific build, so you may see precisely when it looked at the Windows development process. If you hunt for information about a specific build on Microsoft’s Windows Insider website, you can see what ultimate update version a construct correspond to–for instance, that construct 19023 document says it is an early build of 20H1.

So What Do You Do With All This Information?
At times, it feels like different teams at Microsoft are speaking different languages. 1 document talks about 20H2, yet other talks about variant 2009, a technical document refers to build 19042, and the advertising team speaks up the October 2020 Update. They’re all talking about precisely the same thing.

Now that you understand this, it’s easier to make sense of this jumble of variation numbers you see across Microsoft’s sites and within Windows 10 itself.

We advocate using Google or a different internet search engine for a translation tool. If you see a document talking about”variant 1903,” build 18363,” 19H2,” or the”Fall Creators Update” and you are not sure what it is referring to, do a web search for that term and you’ll come across the other titles corresponding to that upgrade.

Hopefully, Microsoft will simplify things further. The confusing year+month variant numbers which don’t really correspond to the month that the update has been published are being downplayed, which is a good beginning.

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